Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Redcliffe Plantation

Our plan was to head home on Saturday but with the change in the weather and cooler temps we decided to stay one more day so we could take in some more adventures. We decided to head to a local plantation, Redcliffe Plantation for the afternoon. We enjoyed a picnic lunch thanks to that great sister-in-law before we took of a tour of the mansion.

The home was built in 1857 by James Henry Hammond a U.S. Congressman, Governor of South Carolina, and U.S. Senator known best for his "Cotton is King!" speech that he made in his fight for slavery to continue.
Redcliffe Plantation
The house had a family living in it until 1975 so it did have electricity and running water installed. The early families had the pleasure of taking a bath in a tin tub, mind you probably 5 people bathed in the same bath water. YUCK!
Redcliffe Plantation
From the upstairs doors (the early air conditioning system that created a cross breeze to keep the house cool) you could see out over the Savannah River Valley and into the hills of Georgia.
Redcliffe Plantation
There was an original apothecary case full of medicines used from the turn of the century in one of the bedrooms.
Redcliffe Plantation
The girls did very well considering we weren't supposed to sit on anything or touch anything!
Redcliffe Plantation
Peanut had a ball considering that she got carried around alot by her cousins!
Redcliffe Plantation
The last spot we visited on the site was the only remaining slave house. This blew my mind. Yes, the house was majestic and beautiful but it did not impact the way the tiny little slave house did. The mansion housed 12 people at most at any given time while the slave house housed up to 20 people at any given time. There were pictures of the families who had been slaves and later sharecroppers or paid domestic employees. It was mind boggling to stand in that tiny little house and imagine the heart breaking things those families had to endure. It was also difficult to explain to an almost 5 year old what that little house really stood for.
Redcliffe Plantation

No comments: